The 10 Most Dangerous Roads in America

| January 24, 2013 | 1 Comment

Plotting a road trip? In many cases, it’s best to take the road less traveled; but there are often good reasons other drivers are taking alternative routes. Of all the roads in the U.S., 10 are consistently the deadliest.

Road-Map-for-Sumans-Blog

 

The following are statistics from 2004-2008 of the roads with the highest accident rates:

#1. 1-95, Florida

images (1)

In-state miles: 382.15

Fatal accidents: 662

Fatal accidents per mile: 1.73

Total fatalities: 765

I-95 in Florida is known as the nation’s deadliest highway, stretching from Miami to Georgia.  The reason for this road’s lethal reputation? One of the biggest complaints is that people drive too fast on these highly congested roads. Police officials also point to increasing instances of distracted driving as triggers for mistakes. Using cell phones, satellite navigation, and video players result in greater damages on highly populated roads.

#2.  1-76, New Jersey

I-76 New Jersey

In-state miles: 3.04

Fatal accidents: 5

Fatal accidents per mile: 1.64

Total fatalities: 6

Route I-76 is a breeding ground for disaster due to its 12 lane highway. It stretches from the Atlantic City Expressway to the Walt Whitman Bridge in Camden County. Research indicates that the hour between 9 p.m. and 10 p.m. is the most dangerous time to drive, and Saturday the most dangerous driving day.

#3. I-4, Florida

I-4

In-state miles: 132.39

Fatal accidents: 209

Fatal accidents per mile: 1.58

Total fatalities: 234

Florida is the host of a couple of treacherous interstates. Distracted drivers, high numbers of large commercial trucks, and poor maintenance are just a few of the contributing factors to high fatality rates on Florida’s highways.

#4. I-15, California

california I-15

In-state miles: 287.26

Fatal accidents: 437

Fatal accidents per mile: 1.52

Total fatalities: 506

Stretching from Clark County, Nevada to San Bernardino County, California, I-15 is among the busiest and most dangerous highways in the country. Because it is the connector from California to Las Vegas, the roads are rife with the potential for peril. Speed, distracted driving, and drinking and driving are all factors to blame, with people indulging in careless behavior en route to Las Vegas.

#5. I-10, California

1-10California

In-state miles: 242.54

Fatal accidents: 341

Fatal accidents per mile:  1.41

Total fatalities: 387

I-10 is one of the interstates most susceptible to danger, running through Los Angeles, Santa Monica, and San Bernardino. The high traffic volume, propensity for drunk driving, distracted driving, and reports of driver fatigue are all factors for fatalities. Due to the frequency of traffic accidents in the area, the California Department of Transportation has constructed special Accident Investigation Sites to focus on curbing the issue.

#6. I-59, Louisiana

I-59

In-state miles: 11.48

Fatal accidents: 16

Fatal accidents per mile: 1.40

Total fatalities: 16

The highway, beginning near New Orleans and ending in Mississippi, has been called the “silent killer.” Though it is short, there’s plenty of room for danger; for example, the narrow two-lane highway in the Kansas stretch was the site of 127 injuries from 77 accidents.

#7. I-94, Illinois

I-94Chicago

In-state miles: 61.53

Fatal accidents: 85

Fatal accidents per mile: 1.38

Total fatalities: 89

The road’s 89 fatalities stem from 85 crashes, across just under 62 in-state miles.  The highway had 1.38 fatalities per square mile. Other causes are single-car accidents such as SUV rollovers, accidents due to hazardous road conditions, and accidents caused by distracted, aggressive, or drunk drivers.

#8. I-93, Massachusetts

I-93MA

In-state miles: 47.07

Fatal accidents: 61

Fatal accidents per mile: 1.30

Total fatalities: 67

One particular deviation, Route 24, which runs from Freetown to the Route 128/I-93 and splits in Randolph, is known as a “death trap.” The interchanges are short and sharp, leaving drivers little room to merge safely onto the highway or slow down on an off-ramp. The highway also has cramped shoulders and thin straightaways, and drivers who travel like speed demons.

#9. I-95, Delaware

I-95 Delaware

In-state miles: 23.43

Fatal accidents: 29

Fatal accidents per mile: 1.24

Total fatalities: 30

The Delaware stretch of I-95 has been home to some high-profile accidents. In one circumstance near Wilmington, a woman lost control of the car, traveled off the west side of the roadway, and rolled over several times, which tragically resulted in her passing. The crash closed I-95 for hours.

#10. Tennessee 1-55

I-55

In-state miles: 12.28

Fatal accidents: 15

Fatal accidents per mile: 1.22

Total fatalities: 16

The high accident rate for the short 12-mile stretch of highways from the Tennessee-Arkansas border to Mississippi is alarming.  One major factor is that the Arkansas border has excessive debris on its roads.  Another causal factor is that the interstate bridges over the Mississippi River at Memphis have a history of accidents, largely attributed to the lack of emergency lanes.

Category: News, Regulations

About the Author ()

Suman is a Content Manager for SmartSign. She's the go to-person for writing and distributing press releases--making sure that SmartSign earns national and international attention and lots o' links. She has been continually published on CNBC.com, Reuters, Yahoo!Finance, the Miami Herald, and many other news outlets. Suman blogs, writes and edits articles, and dabbles in social media. Prior to New York, she's lived in really exotic places known as Boston and Connecticut.

Comments (1)

Trackback URL | Comments RSS Feed

  1. DM says:

    Awesome post Suman! Really interesting. I guess this means I should stop taking the BoltBus to DC….

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *