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The Top Ten Worst and Best States for Pedestrian Safety

| August 13, 2012 | 1 Comment

from PedestrianSigns.com

The number of pedestrian accidents and fatalities varies with location (via PedestrianSigns).

August 13, 2012 — The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration just released 2010 Data on pedestrian safety. Pedestrian fatalities accounted for about 13% of all traffic-related deaths in 2010, amounting to 4280 deaths in the United States.  This is a four percent increase from 2009, when 4109 pedestrians were killed in the U.S.

Using the data provided by the NHTSA, we’ve compiled the top ten most pedestrian friendly states and the top ten most dangerous states for pedestrians.  For reference, the national average for pedestrian deaths is 1.38 per 100,000 residents.

A pedestrian crossing Broadway, in New York City .

Top 10 Most Dangerous Pedestrian States*

1. Florida

Florida averaged 2.58 fatalities per 100,000, with a total of 487 pedestrian fatalities in 2010.

2. Delaware

Delaware averaged 2.45 fatalities per 100,000, with a total of 22 pedestrian fatalities in 2010.

3. Arizona

Arizona averaged 2.28 fatalities per 100,000, with a total of 146 pedestrian fatalities in 2010.

4. South Carolina

South Carolina averaged 1.94 fatalities per 100,000, with a total of 90 pedestrian fatalities in 2010.

5. Hawaii

Hawaii averaged 1.91 fatalities per 100,000, with a total of 26 pedestrian fatalities in 2010.

6. North Carolina

North Carolina averaged 1.77 fatalities per 100,000, with a total of 169 pedestrian fatalities in 2010.

7. Maryland

Maryland averaged 1.75 fatalities per 100,000, with a total of 101 pedestrian fatalities in 2010.

8. Georgia

Georgia averaged 1.73 fatalities per 100,000, with a total of 168 pedestrian fatalities in 2010.

9. Mississippi

Mississippi averaged 1.68 fatalities per 100,000, with a total of 50 pedestrian fatalities in 2010.

10. Oklahoma

Oklahoma averaged 1.65 fatalities per 100,000, with a total of 62 pedestrian fatalities in 2010.

*Puerto Rico, though not included in the US average has the highest pedestrian fatality rate of any state or territory, with 2.71 pedestrian deaths per 100,000.

from PedestrianSigns.com

Signs like these make it clear where pedestrians shouldn’t walk (via PedestrianSigns).

Top 10 Safest States for Pedestrians

1. Nebraska

Nebraska averaged just 0.44 fatalities per 100,000, with a total of only 8 pedestrian fatalities in 2010.

2. Kansas 0.52

Kansas averaged 0.52 fatalities per 100,000 with a total of 15 pedestrian fatalities in 2010.

3. Wyoming 0.53

Wyoming averaged 0.53 fatalities per 100,000 with a total of 3 pedestrian fatalities in 2010.

4. Iowa 0.59

Iowa averaged 0.59 fatalities per 100,000 with a total of 18 pedestrian fatalities in 2010.

5. Idaho 0.64

Idaho averaged 0.64 fatalities per 100,000 with a total of 10 pedestrian fatalities in 2010.

6. Vermont 0.64

Vermont averaged 0.64 fatalities per 100,000 with a total of 4 pedestrian fatalities in 2010.

7. Minnesota 0.66

Minnesota averaged 0.66 fatalities per 100,000 with a total of 35 pedestrian fatalities in 2010.

8. New Hampshire 0.68

New Hampshire averaged 0.68 fatalities per 100,000 with a total of 9 pedestrian fatalities in 2010.

9. West Virginia 0.70

West Virginia averaged 0.70 fatalities per 100,000 with a total of 13 pedestrian fatalities in 2010.

10. Colorado 0.71

Colorado averaged 0.71 fatalities per 100,000 with a total of 36 pedestrian fatalities in 2010.

Factors such as population, urbanization, and overall pedestrian walking distance all play contributing roles in pedestrian accidents and fatalities. Many of the most dangerous states are tourist destinations, with a high amount of pedestrians less familiar with the location.  In the case of Florida, a high population of elderly people may contribute to the number of pedestrian accidents, as the NHSTA labels the older demographic as the most at-risk for fatality when involved in a pedestrian traffic accident. Overall, remember to cross at a marked crossing and to be familiar with and aware of your surroundings.

– K. Howitt

Category: News, Regulations

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