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No Parking Stencils: Frequently Asked Questions

Q. What are the key advantages of using No Parking Stencils?

A.

Reusability: One of the major advantages of stencils is that they can be reused. Stencils can be used over and over again to imprint the same message at multiple locations.

Cost-effective: Since no parking stencils are reusable, it saves the cost of buying separate signs for multiple locations. Just buy a single stencil and imprint the same message at many locations.

Visibility: A stenciled message is right under the nose and can’t be missed, unlike a mounted sign which may become inconspicuous due to any visual obstructions.

Flexibility: Stencils can be used literally anywhere, even on walls or grounds or any place you want. Unlike signs, stencils don’t need any hardware to mount.

Q. Where can No Parking stencils be used?

A.

No Parking stencils can be used to clearly mark a curb or parking lot area where parking is restricted. They are also used in abundance for - 

Fire Lanes: Various jurisdictions like Washington require the pavement adjacent to the painted curbs of a designated fire lane to have the marking “No Parking – Fire Lane” in block lettering measuring at least 18 inches in height with a three-inch brush stroke. Lettering shall be yellow and spaced at no more than 50-foot intervals.

Disabled Parking: In many states like Los Angeles, access aisles shall be marked with words "NO PARKING" painted in white letters and a minimum of 12 inches (1 foot) in height. You can paint an accessible parking space or a van accessible parking space using No Parking Stencils. 

Private Properties: Property owners can get rid of the problem of illegitimate parking or vehicles blocking garage doors on their property. Keep your space reserved at all times by painting messages like “No Parking In Front of Door”, “No Parking Ever”, or “Do Not Block” with stencils. 

Q. Can a stenciled No Parking message be legally enforced?

A.
Various state transportation departments require No Parking messages to be painted in designated areas like access aisles, fire lanes, loading docks, drop off zones, and more. Handicap parking stencils became legally required in almost all parking lots with the formation of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Marking access aisles with No Parking stencils is now a common requirement.

Q. Can stencils be used as a replacement of No Parking Signs?

A.

Stencils can be used in addition with no parking signs, but as such can’t replace them. For instance, ADA requires a wheelchair sign on the pavement “along with” an upright sign to reserve a parking space only for the disabled. Also, to legally tow in a fire lane, there must be both - markings on the curb or pavement and on the upright sign.

A stenciled “No Parking” impression on the pavement can give more weightage to your No Parking sign on the post or wall, but can’t solely replace it. That said, stencils are a good addition to signs because they can’t get stolen or tampered like signs. Also, maintenance costs of signs are high as they can rust, be hit by a car and or be otherwise damaged.

Q. Which are the most common stencil ink colors in use?

A.

Parking lot pavement markings and curb striping in different colors are used to clarify parking and other curb-use rules. Read on to know what different colors generally mean:

  • White: White is the most preferred stencil ink color among all. White mostly indicates “parking allowed.” If the curbs are painted white, drivers can stop long enough to pick up or drop off passengers or mail, but not park there long-term.
  • Blue: Blue stencil ink is generally used to mark parking spaces for the disabled.
  • Yellow: Yellow is another common stencil ink used to paint “No Parking” stripes or mark school zones. If curbs are painted yellow, it indicates drop-off zones, while drivers have to stay in their vehicle.
  • Green: Green curbs indicate parking for limited time.
  • Red: Red generally indicates “No parking”, “No Stopping” or “No Standing”. Busses, emergency vehicles, though, can stop at red markings. Red is also used to designate fire lanes and fire hydrants.

You should check with your local codes and ordinances which may differ in their color requirements for various pavements markings.

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